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Civility and Public Service: November 2016

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November 2016


Photo of Dean Corey CookDear Reader,

We have just come through an unfortunately divisive and uncivil national election in which the importance of public service was obscured. Fortunately, we were also just reminded on Veteran’s Day of those who have served their communities and our country with honor and distinction.

Our school was created to inspire and equip students to be ethical, innovative, and effective leaders – virtues embodied by our veterans, over a thousand of which are Boise State students and 152 of which are Bronco faculty and staff.

In this issue of Public Interest, we will share some of the ways we are educating future leaders in civility and public service. We also share how we are aiding public servants in Idaho and beyond by being a resource for informed decision-making.
Sincerely,
Corey Cook
Dean, School of Public Service
Boise State University


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New Idaho Policy Institute provides objective research and analysis to aid in informed decision-making

Photo of IPI launchThe new Idaho Policy Institute has opened its doors near the state capitol in downtown Boise. Created by the School of Public Service, the Institute brings together faculty experts, well-trained and energetic students and community partners to address problems of public concern. Using thorough research and analysis, IPI is a new resource for decision makers across the state.

As an independent source of research and analysis for decision-makers throughout Idaho, the Institute provides rigorous analyses of vital public policy issues, economic impact studies, demographic research, and implementation of high quality opinion surveys to stimulate constructive discussions about innovative solutions to public problems both among decision makers and the broader public.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE IDAHO POLICY INSTITUTE ON THE IPI WEBSITE >


TREASURE VALLEY COMMUNITY SURVEY REVEALS A POSITIVE OUTLOOK ABOUT QUALITY OF LIFE

Image of Treasure Valley SurveyTreasure Valley residents, the majority of whom are transplants, feel that the Treasure Valley is a good, safe place to work and raise a family. The Treasure Valley Community Survey, conducted by our the Idaho Policy Institute, also revealed that education is seen the most important issue facing Idaho and that residents want more public transportation options.

Boise State associate professor of political science Justin Vaughn coordinated the survey. Vaughn states, “The real value of this survey is that it provides decision makers with a great deal of information about public preferences and priorities.”

READ MORE ABOUT THE TREASURE VALLEY COMMUNITY SURVEY IN UPDATE>


BOISE STATE PUBLIC POLICY & ADMINISTRATION PROFESSOR DISCUSSES “DIFFERENT FLAVORS OF ENVIRONMENTALISM”

Dr. Luke Fowler of Boise State’s Public Policy and Administration Department was interviewed about “Environmentalism and Politics” for The American Association of Colleges and University’s Academic Minute. Dr. Fowler’s research on different regional approaches to environmentalism can also be found in The Blue Review, Boise State’s Journal of popular scholarship.

READ ABOUT DIFFERENT FLAVORS OF ENVIRONMENTALISM IN THE BLUE REVIEW >

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BOISE STATE CRIMINAL JUSTICE HOSTS “CHASING THE DRAGON” FILM SCREENING TO RAISE AWARENESS OF OPIOID EPIDEMIC

According to the Center for Disease Control, deaths from opioid overdose, including prescription painkillers, has increased by nearly four-fold since 1999.  As part of National Opioid Awareness Week, the Boise State Criminal Justice Department hosted a viewing the film Chasing the Dragon which included a discussion US Attorney Wendy Olson, DEA Investigator Chuck Wahl, and representatives from the FBI.

READ MORE ABOUT THE “CHASING THE DRAGON” AND THE OPIOID EPIDEMIC IN THE IDAHO PRESS-TRIBUNE >

 

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PUBLIC POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION AWARDING FIRST PHD

Thirty-six Public Policy faculty, staff, family and members of the Boise State community observed Matthew May’s defense of his PhD dissertation “Closed Primary, Exposed Preferences: Idaho’s Primary System and the Bureaucratic Dilemma.” May examined the impact of Idaho’s shift to a closed primary system on state government officials, exploring the relationship between required party declaration and potential self-disenfranchisement.

University Distinguished Professor of Political Science Emeritus Dr. Gary Moncrief was impressed. Moncrief states, “Matthew’s dissertation is an excellent example of scholarship. It speaks to both theory and practical application. It is a unique and very original research project that investigates an aspect of the primary system that no one has looked at previously, and I expect it will be cited by political scientists and public administration scholars alike.”

Read the Executive summary of “Closed Primary, Exposed Preferences: Idaho’s Primary System and the Bureaucratic Dilemma.”

SEE MORE PHOTOS OF MATTHEW MAY’S DISSERTATION DEFENSE ON THE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC SERVICE FACEBOOK PAGE>

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Frank Church Conference and the Partisan divide

The Frank Church Institute hosted it 33rd annual Frank Church Conference on October 28 in the Boise State Student Union’s Simplot Ballroom. This year’s keynote speakers were former U.S. Representatives Martin Frost (D-Texas) and Tom Davis (R-Virginia), chairmen of the Democratic and Republican campaign committees, respectively. Other presenters included Dr. Cornell Clayton of Washington State University’s Thomas Foley Institute for Public Policy and Public Service and David Adler, director of the Alturas Institute. The theme of this year’s Conference, “Politics and Prose: America Votes,” focused on the election and political civility.

WATCH THE VIDEO OF THE 2016 FRANK CHURCH CONFERENCE >

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