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Jessica Wells, Ph.D.

Photo of Jessica WellsEDUCATION

Ph.D., Criminal Justice and Criminology (2017). Sam Houston State University
M.A., Criminal Justice and Criminology (2013). Sam Houston State University
B.A., Criminology and Criminal Justice (2011). Southern Illinois University-Carbondale.

RECENT PUBLICATIONS:

Cooke, E., Armstrong, T., Boisvert, D., Wells, J., Lewis, R., Gangitano, D., & Hughes-Stamm, S. (2018). “The relationship between the MAOA-uVNTR polymorphism, delinquent peer affiliation, and antisocial behavior with a consideration of gender.” Accepted at Psychiatric Quarterly.

Wells, J., Armstrong, T., Boisvert, D., Lewis, R., Gangitano, D., & Hughes-Stamm, S. (2017). Stress, genes, and generalizability across gender: Effects of MAOA and stress sensitivity on crime and delinquency. Criminology, 55, 548-574.

Boisvert, D., Wells, J., Armstrong, T., & Lewis, R. (2017). Serotonin and self-control: A genetically moderated stress sensitization effect. Journal of Criminal Justice.

Boisvert, D., Wells, J., Armstrong, T., Lewis, R., & Woeckner, M. & Nobles, M. (2017). Low resting heart rate and stalking. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. 0886260517698823.

Wells, J., Armstrong, T., Boutwell, B., Boisvert, D., Flores, S., Symonds, M., & Gangitano, D. (2015). Molecular genetic underpinnings of self-control: 5-HTTLPR and self-control in a sample of inmates. Journal of Criminal Justice, 43(5), 386-396.

Armstrong, G. S., Atkin-Plunk, C. A., & Wells, J. (2015). The relationship between work–family conflict, correctional officer job stress, and job satisfaction. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 42(10), 1066-1082.

Research interests: Biosocial underpinnings of antisocial behavior and associated psychological traits including self-control, aggression, and psychopathy; the role of stress in development; substance use and abuse.

Curriculum Vitae for Dr. Jessica Wells (pdf)