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The PoliSci Newsletter

Idaho Education Changes Under Attack – Tight Race

Gary Moncrief, professor in the Department of Political Science, was quoted in a Stateline and Huffington Post story about attempts to repeal a package of education measures on the ballot as Propositions 1, 2 and 3. Moncrief noted that the impact of this vote could spill over into other races. Read “Idaho Education Changes Under Attack” in the Huffington Post here.

Read the Update report about Idaho Changes Under Attack.

Mike Touchton and Brian Wampler were selected winners of the LAPIS 2013 Best Paper Award

Mike Touchton and Brian Wampler, professors of political science, were selected winners of the LAPIS 2013 Best Paper Award for their coauthored paper “Improving Social Well-Being through New Democratic Institutions,” which they presented at the LASA 2012 Congress.

“This paper asks important questions about how participatory budgeting affects citizens’ well-being. Using an original and a large N data base of Brazilian municipalities, the authors show that the situation of the poor is improved through an increase in spending on health care and sanitation, which is reflected in a reduction in the rates of child mortality. The effect grows with time and when the political party implementing the participatory budget believes in its principles. Interestingly, the authors claim that in contrast to the theorized bias in representative democracy towards middle and upper class groups, the new institution of participatory budgeting, can help overcome this bias and benefit the poor. Thus, this paper makes an important contribution to our knowledge about the social and political consequences of participatory budgeting, one that will inform normative as well as empirical debates about participatory democracy.”

Wampler also is a featured speaker at the National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation’s bi-annual conference on Oct. 12-14 in Seattle, Wash.

Read about LAPIS 2013 Best Paper Award in Update.

Dr. Justin Vaughn Interviewed by the Spokane/Pacific Northwest Inlander

Justin Vaughn, assistant professor of political science, was interviewed by the Spokane/Pacific Northwest Inlander for an article about the 1st Congressional District race. Vaughn joined Boise State this fall. His current research projects include examinations of the strategic dimensions of presidential rhetoric and the role popular culture plays in shaping the presidential image. Read the Inlander article.

 

Read Prof. Justin Vaughn’s thoughts on the 1st Congressional Race in Update.

Dr. John Freemuth is quoted in a KBOI 2 news story

John Freemuth, professor of political science, was quoted in a KBOI 2 news story about expectations prior to the first presidential debate. Read the story here.

Read about expectations prior to the first presidential debate in Update: your source for campus news.

Ross Burkhart co-authors an article published in the Idaho Law Review

Andy Hyer, Lee Hannah and Sarah Toevs in the Department of Community and Environmental Health and Ross Burkhart in the Department of Political Science co-authored an article published in the Idaho Law Review titled: “Paying for Long-Term Care in the Gem State: A Survey of the Federal and State Laws Influencing How Long-Term Care Services for Idaho’s Growing Aged and Disabled Populations Are — and Will Be — Funded.”

The need for long-term care (LTC) services in Idaho are expected to increase dramatically as the state’s population ages, and the cost of providing such services also is expected to grow at a staggering rate in coming years. This policy survey takes a comprehensive look at the various federal and state laws impacting how such services are paid for in Idaho, whether it be Medicaid, LTC insurance, home equity or other means. In providing such “a foundational overview of the current policy landscape affecting LTC funding in Idaho,” the article serves as a valuable resource for policymakers considering ways to reform LTC funding policies in Idaho and demographically similar states. Such an overview should also prove a helpful resource to individuals, financial planners, attorneys, health care professionals and others seeking to understand the complex LTC financing system.

The faculty involved in this “cross-college” effort came together through the Center for the  Study of Aging and were supported through a grant from the College of Social Sciences and Public Affairs. As the “scholarly voice of the University of Idaho College of Law,” the Idaho Law Review has been “a valuable resource for judges, practitioners, and scholars around the country for more than 40 years.”

Full citation: Andrew M. Hyer et al., Paying for Long-Term Care in the Gem State, 48 Idaho L. Rev. 351 (2012). The article is available on the Law Review’s website at http://www.uidaho.edu/law/law-review/articles.

The original post was found on UPDATE site. Locate that post Read “Paying for Long-Term Care in the Gem State: A Survey of the Federal and State Laws Influencing How Long-Term Care Services for Idaho’s Growing Aged and Disabled Populations Are — and Will Be — Funded” in Update.

Dr. Gary Moncrief is quoted in a Boise State Public Radio Story

Gary Moncrief, a professor in the Department of Political Science, was quoted in a Boise State Public Radio story on citizens taking on lawmakers over controversial issues. Moncrief noted that citizen vetoes are rare and tend to happen when a state is dominated by one party, where legislative majorities can pass bills not supported by the masses.  Read about citizens taking on lawmakers over controversial issues.

The original story can be found Read about citizens taking on lawmakers on Update.

College of Social Sciences and Public Affairs – Annual Report

The College of Social Sciences and Public Affairs Annual Report can be viewed here.

Dr. Scott Yenor is contributor for SeeThruEdu.com

The Texas Public Policy Foundation’s Center for Higher Education unveils a new website, SeeThruEdu.com, which focuses on higher education reform.  The site offers daily postings by leading higher education experts from across the country.

SeeThruEdu.com serves as part resource bank, part discussion area bringing national resources to state scenarios for the principles of academic rigor, fiscal transparency, affordability, and accountability,” said Thomas Lindsay, Ph.D., Director of the Center for Higher Education at the Texas Public Policy Foundation. “We assembled some of the best minds in academia to offer their thoughts on important reform issues in the higher education realm.”

Content published at SeeThruEdu.com ranges from commentary to academic reports, and provides fresh perspectives that challenge much of the current discourse and offer constructive alternatives.

Article courtesy of MarketWatch.

Respecting Posterity’s Property: John Freemuth

John Freemuth, professor of public administration, will be part of a panel looking at “Respecting Posterity’s Property” at a conference titled “The National Possessed: The Conflicting Claims on America’s Public Lands.” The conference is Sept. 11-14 at the University of Colorado, Boulder. The panel addressed movements over the years to privatize public lands or return them to the states, and the costs and benefits of such changes.

Originally posted 8/28/12 in Read About Respecting Posterity’s Property in Update.

John Freemuth receives U.S. Geological Survey grant

Newswise — Boise State University political scientist and public land policy expert John Freemuth has received a $275,000 grant from the U.S. Geological Survey to improve the availability and usefulness of data on lands managed by the federal, state and local governments.

Read more about the US Geological Survey Grant…